RATS, MICE, MOUSE, RODENTS, KILL RATS, KILL MICE, ABOUT MICE, ABOUT RATS, GET RID OF RATS, GET RID OF MICE, ABOUT RODENTS, RODENT CONTROL, pest control, rodents, rats, mice, mouse, rat traps, trap, bait, pest control products, traps, ORANGE COUNTY PEST CONTROL, PEST CONTROL ORANGE COUNTY, PEST CONTROL IN ORANGE COUNTY, BEST PEST CONTROL ORANGE COUNTY, Fumigation, Exterminator, Los Angeles, Riverside, San Bernardino, Anaheim, 92801, 92802, 92803, 92804, 92805, 92806, 92807, 92808, 92809, 92812, 92814, 92815, 92816, 92817, 92825, 92850, 92899, Brea, 92821, 92822, 92823, Buena Park, 90620, 90621, 90622, 90623, 90624, Costa Mesa, 92626, 92627, 92628, Cypress, 90630, Fountain Valley, 92708, 92728, Fullerton, 92831, 92832, 92833, 92834, 92835, 92836, 92837, 92838, Garden Grove, 92840, 92841, 92842, 92843, 92844, 92845, 92846, Huntington Beach 92605, 92615, 92646, 92647, 92648, 92649, Irvine, 92602, 92603, 92604, 92606, 92612, 92614, 92616, 92618, 92619, 92620, 92623, 92650, 92697, 92709, 92710, La Habra, 90631, 90632, 90633, La Palma, 90623, Los Alamitos, 90720, 90721, Orange, 92856, 92857, 92859, 92861, 92862, 92863, 92864, 92865, 92866, 92867, 92868, 92869, Placentia 92870, 92871, Santa Ana, 92701, 92702, 92703, 92704, 92705, 92706, 92707, 92708, 92711, 92712, 92725, 92728, 92735, 92799, Seal Beach, 90740, Stanton, 90680, Tusin, 92780, 92781, 92782, Villa Park, 92861, 92867, Westminister, 92683, 92684, 92685, Yorba Linda, 92885, 92886, 92887,Aliso Viejo, 92653, 92656, 92698, Dana Point, 92624, 92629,Laguna Beach, 92607, 92637, 92651, 92652, 92653, 92654, 92656, 92677, 92698, Laguna Hills, 92637, 92653, 92654, 92656, Laguna Niguel, 92607, 92677, Laguna Woods, 92653, 92654, Lake Forest, 92609, 92630, Mission Viejo, 92675, 92690, 92691, 92692, 92694, Newport Beach, 92657, 92658, 92659, 92660, 92661, 92662, 92663, Rancho Santa Margarita, 92688, San Clemente, 92672, 92673, 92674, San Juan Capistrano, 92675, 92690, 92691, 92692, 92693, 92694, Ladera Ra,nch, 92694, Coto De Caza 92679 Anaheim Hills, 92807, 92808, 92809, 92817, Dove Canyon, 92679, Coto De Caza, 92679, Newport Coast, 92657, Corona Del Mar, 92625, El Modena, Las Flores, Midway City, Orange Park Acres, Rossmoor, Silverado Canyon, Sunset Beach, Surfside, Trabuco Canyon, Talega, Tustin Foothills , OC


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Our Customers call us from the Orange County zipcodes and cities: Anaheim, 92801, 92802, 92803, 92804, 92805, 92806, 92807, 92808, 92809, 92812, 92814, 92815, 92816, 92817, 92825, 92850, 92899, Brea, 92821, 92822, 92823, Buena Park, 90620, 90621, 90622, 90623, 90624, Costa Mesa, 92626, 92627, 92628, Cypress, 90630, Fountain Valley, 92708, 92728, Fullerton, 92831, 92832, 92833, 92834, 92835, 92836, 92837, 92838, Garden Grove, 92840, 92841, 92842, 92843, 92844, 92845, 92846, Huntington Beach 92605, 92615, 92646, 92647, 92648, 92649, Irvine, 92602, 92603, 92604, 92606, 92612, 92614, 92616, 92618, 92619, 92620, 92623, 92650, 92697, 92709, 92710, La Habra, 90631, 90632, 90633, La Palma, 90623, Los Alamitos, 90720, 90721, Orange, 92856, 92857, 92859, 92861, 92862, 92863, 92864, 92865, 92866, 92867, 92868, 92869, Placentia 92870, 92871, Santa Ana, 92701, 92702, 92703, 92704, 92705, 92706, 92707, 92708, 92711, 92712, 92725, 92728, 92735, 92799, Seal Beach, 90740, Stanton, 90680, Tusin, 92780, 92781, 92782, Villa Park, 92861, 92867, Westminister, 92683, 92684, 92685, Yorba Linda, 92885, 92886, 92887,Aliso Viejo, 92653, 92656, 92698, Dana Point, 92624, 92629,Laguna Beach, 92607, 92637, 92651, 92652, 92653, 92654, 92656, 92677, 92698, Laguna Hills, 92637, 92653, 92654, 92656, Laguna Niguel, 92607, 92677, Laguna Woods, 92653, 92654, Lake Forest, 92609, 92630, Mission Viejo, 92675, 92690, 92691, 92692, 92694, Newport Beach, 92657, 92658, 92659, 92660, 92661, 92662, 92663, Rancho Santa Margarita, 92688, San Clemente, 92672, 92673, 92674, San Juan Capistrano, 92675, 92690, 92691, 92692, 92693, 92694, Ladera Ra,nch, 92694, Coto De Caza 92679 Anaheim Hills, 92807, 92808, 92809, 92817, Dove Canyon, 92679, Coto De Caza, 92679, Newport Coast, 92657, Corona Del Mar, 92625, El Modena, Las Flores, Midway City, Orange Park Acres, Rossmoor, Silverado Canyon, Sunset Beach, Surfside, Trabuco Canyon, Talega, Tustin Foothills


ARTICLE 6:
ALL ABOUT RODENTS (RAT AND MICE PEST CONTROL)
...

ALL ABOUT RODENTS (RAT AND MICE PEST CONTROL)

ABOUT RATS

Rats are various medium sized, long-tailed rodents of the superfamily Muroidea. "True rats" are members of the genus Rattus, the most important of which to humans are the black rat, Rattus rattus, and the brown rat, Rattus norvegicus. Many members of other rodent genera and families are also called rats and share many characteristics with true rats. Rats are distinguished from mice by their size; rats generally have bodies longer than 12 cm (5 in).

The best-known rat species are the Black Rat (Rattus rattus) and the Brown Rat (Rattus norvegicus). The group is generally known as the Old World rats or true rats, and originated in Asia. Rats are bigger than most Old World mice, which are their relatives, but seldom weigh over 500 grams (1 lb) in the wild. The term "rat" is also used in the names of other small mammals which are not true rats. Examples include the North American pack rats, a number of species loosely called kangaroo rats, and others. Rats such as the Bandicoot rat (Bandicota bengalensis) are murine rodents related to true rats, but are not members of the genus Rattus. The widely distributed and problematic commensal species of rats are a minority in this diverse genus. Many species of rats are island endemics and some have become endangered due to habitat loss or competition with the Brown, Black or Polynesian rat. In Western countries, many people keep domesticated rats as pets. These are of the species R. norvegicus, which originated in the grasslands of China and spread to Europe and eventually, in 1775, to the New World. Pet rats are Brown Rats descended from those bred for research, and are often called "fancy rats", but are the same species as the common city "sewer" rat. Domesticated rats tend to be both more docile than their wild ancestors and more disease prone, presumably due to inbreeding. The common species are opportunistic survivors and often live with and near humans. The Black Plague is traditionally believed to have been caused by the micro-organism Yersinia pestis, carried by the Tropical Rat Flea (Xenopsylla cheopis) which preyed on R. rattus living in European cities of the day; these rats were victims of the plague themselves. While modern wild rats can carry Leptospirosis and some other "zoonotic" conditions (those which can be transferred across species, to humans, for example), these conditions are in fact rarely found (not true in neotropical countries).[citation needed] Wild rats living in good environments are typically healthy and robust animals. Wild rats living in cities may suffer from poor diets and internal parasites and mites, but do not generally spread disease to humans. The normal lifespan of rats ranges from two to five years, and is typically three years.

As pets
Specially bred rats have been kept as pets at least since the late 19th century. Pet rats are typically of variants of the species Brown rat, but Black rats and Giant pouched rats are also known to be kept. Pet rats behave differently than their wild counterparts depending on how many generations they have been kept as pets. Pet rats do not pose any more of a health risk than pets such as cats and dogs. Tamed rats are generally friendly and can be taught to perform selected behaviors.

As subjects of scientific research
In 1895, Clark University in Worcester, Massachusetts (United States) established a population of domestic white brown rats to study the effects of diet and for other physiological studies. Over the years, rats have been used in many experimental studies, which have added to our understanding of genetics, diseases, the effects of drugs, and other topics that have provided a great benefit for the health and wellbeing of humankind. Laboratory rats have also proved valuable in psychological studies of learning and other mental processes (Barnett 2002). A 2007 study found rats to possess metacognition, a mental ability previously only documented in humans and some primates. Domestic rats differ from wild rats in many ways. They are calmer and less likely to bite; they can tolerate greater crowding; they breed earlier and produce more offspring; and their brains, livers, kidneys, adrenal glands, and hearts are smaller (Barnett 2002). Brown rats are often used as model organisms for scientific research. When conducting genetic research rats are much rarer than mice. When it comes to conducting tests related to intelligence, learning, and drug abuse, rats are a popular choice due to their high intelligence, ingenuity, aggressiveness, and adaptability. Their psychology, in many ways, seems to be similar to humans. Entirely new breeds or "lines" of brown rats like the Wistar rat have been bred for use in laboratories. Much of the genome of Rattus norvegicus has been sequenced.

ABOUT MICE

A mouse (plural mice) is a small animal that belongs to one of numerous species of rodents. The best known mouse species is the common house mouse (Mus musculus). It is found in nearly all countries and, as the laboratory mouse, serves as a model organism in biology. It is also a popular pet. The American white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus) and the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus) also sometimes live in houses. These species of mice live commensally with humans. Although mice may live up to two years in the lab, the average mouse in the wild lives only about 5 months, primarily due to heavy predation. Cats, wild dogs, foxes, birds of prey, snakes and even certain kinds of insects have been known to prey heavily upon mice. Nevertheless, due to its remarkable adaptability to almost any environment, and its ability to live commensally with humans, the mouse is regarded to be the third most successful mammalian species living on Earth today, after humans and the rat. Mice can be harmful pests, damaging and eating crops and spreading diseases through their parasites and feces. In western North America, breathing dust that has come in contact with mouse feces has been linked to the deadly hantavirus. The original motivation for the domestication of cats is thought to have been for their predation of mice and their relatives, the rats.

Characteristics
Mice range in size from 5 to 7 inches (13 to 18 cm) long (including a long tail). They weigh from 1/4 to 2 ounces (7 to 57 gm). The coat color ranges from white to brown to gray. Most mice have a pointed snout with long whiskers, round ears, and thin tails. Many mice scurry along the ground, but some can hop or jump.

Distribution and Habitat
All species of Mus are native to Eurasia and Africa, where they range from lowlands to mountaintops. The five species in the subgenus Pyromys are found in Sri Lanka, India, Pakistan, and mainland Southeast Asia. Much of their range originally consisted of open grasslands or grassy patches in forests.

Behavior
Mice are timid, social, and territorial. They are usually active in the night time, while others, such as the harvest mouse, are active both day and night. Mice rely on their senses while exploring their environment. One dominant sense is that of olfaction. While exploring their environment, mice actively sniff to acquire information about their surroundings. Sniffing behavior is therefore important in guiding behaviors such as feeding, reproduction, and rearing young. While resting a mouse will sniff between 2-4 times a second, a frequency which increases to levels between 6-15 times a second when the animal is aroused or actively exploring odors.

Reproduction
Breeding onset is at about 50 days of age in both females and males, although females may have their first estrus at 25-40 days. Mice are polyestrous and breed year round; ovulation is spontaneous. The duration of the estrous cycle is 4-5 days and estrus itself lasts about 12 hours, occurring in the evening. Vaginal smears are useful in timed matings to determine the stage of the estrous cycle. Mating is usually nocturnal and may be confirmed by the presence of a copulatory plug in the vagina up to 24 hours post-copulation. The presence of sperm on a vaginal smear is also a reliable indicator of mating. [6] Female mice housed together tend to go into anestrus and do not cycle. If exposed to a male mouse or the pheromones of a male mouse, most of the females will go into estrus in about 72 hours. This synchronization of the estrous cycle is known as the Whitten effect. The exposure of a recently bred mouse to the pheromones of a strange male mouse may prevent implantation (or pseudopregnancy), a phenomenon known as the Bruce effect. The average gestation period is 20 days. A fertile postpartum estrus occurs 14-24 hours following parturition, and simultaneous lactation and gestation prolongs gestation 3-10 days due to delayed implantation. The average litter size is 10-12 during optimum production, but is highly strain dependent. As a general rule, inbred mice tend to have longer gestation periods and smaller litters than outbred and hybrid mice. The young are called pups and weigh 0.5-1.5 grams at birth, are hairless, and have closed eyelids and ears. Cannibalism is uncommon, but females should not be disturbed during parturition and for at least 2 days postpartum. Pups are weaned at 3 weeks of age; weaning weight is 10-12 grams. If the postpartum estrus is not utilized, the female resumes cycling 2-5 days postweaning. Newborn male mice are distinguished from newborn females by noting the greater anogenital distance and larger genial papilla in the male. This is best accomplished by lifting the tails of littermates and comparing perineums.

As Pets
Mice have gained popularity as pets. Many people buy mice as companion pets. They can be playful, loving and will get used to being handled, and run to you. Pet mice should not be left unsupervised outside as they have many natural predators such as birds. Male mice tend to have a stronger odor than the females, making females preferable even though they tend to be more expensive. Well looked after mice can make ideal pets. Some common mouse care products are: * Cage - Usually a hamster or gerbil cage, but special mouse cages are now available. You can also use a small aquarium (5 gallons for up to 3 mice, 10 gallons for 8 or so mice) with a mesh top, so there is no risk of them escaping. But this is not recommended, as the lack of proper ventilation can cause respiratory complications in mice. * Food - Special pelleted and seed-based food is available. Mice can generally eat most rodent food (for rats, mice, hamsters, gerbils, etc) * Bedding - Usually made of hardwood pulp, such as aspen, sometimes from shredded, uninked paper or recycled virgin wood pulp. Cedar or pine should not be used because they contain harmful liquids that can damage any rodent's respiratory system. Corn husk bedding should not be used because it promotes Aspergillis fungus, can grow mold once it gets wet and is rough on their feet. There should be at least 2 inches of bedding to allow the mice to dig and burrow. You may also use shredded paper and/or shredded tissues.

Some benefits of having mice as pets are * Minimal shedding and allergens * Entertaining and affectionate * Inexpensive * Clean (contrary to popular belief) * Socially self-sufficient when in a group of other mice * Significantly less likely to bite than other rodent pets * Quite intelligent given their size * Fun * Loving

Disadvantages include: * Small and quite fragile (not as easy to handle as a dog or a cat) * Defecate and urinate frequently * Nocturnal * Frequent eye infections when under stress * Easily subject to disease when without optimal care * Frequent reproduction * Short lifespan * Susceptibility to many diseases

Laboratory mice
Mice are common experimental animals in biology and psychology primarily because they are mammals, and so share a high degree of homology with humans. They are the most commonly used mammalian model organism, more common than rats. The mouse genome has been sequenced, and virtually all mouse genes have human homologs. They can also be manipulated in ways that would be considered unethical to do with humans (note Animal Rights). A knockout mouse is a genetically engineered mouse that has had one or more of its genes made inoperable through a gene knockout. There are other reasons for why mice are used in laboratory research. Mice are small, inexpensive, easily maintained, and can reproduce quickly. Several generations of mice can be observed in a relatively short period of time. Mice are generally very docile if raised from birth and given sufficient human contact. However, certain strains have been known to be quite temperamental. Mice (and rats) have the same organs in the same places, just different proportions. There are hundreds of established inbred, outbred, and transgenic strains. In the United States, mice are not protected by the Animal Welfare Act (AWA) (administered by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), APHIS). However, the Public Health Service Act (PHS) administered by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) does cover their treatment.

Rats and Mice Facts
Rats and Mice
have been responsible for or implicated in the spread of various diseases to people and domestic animals for years. Today however, because of improvements in sanitation, effective drugs, and rodent and insect control programs, the disease threat from rodents is not as significant as it once was. But because of the habits of rodents traveling in sewers, garbage, etc., there are still cases of human and animal diseases being transmitted and there is also the constant potential of disease outbreaks in cities where rats and mice live in close proximity to people. However small the threat may be, it is a potential that always must be kept in mind.

Some of the more common diseases transmitted by rats and mice or parasites that they carry are -

Plague
- which is spread from rats to people by the oriental rat flea.

Murine Typhus
- caused by a bacterial organism which is transmitted from infected rats to people also by the oriental rat flea.

Rickettsial pox
- also caused by a bacterial organism is transmitted by mites from mice to people. Mainly in areas of New York City and several New England Cities.

Salmonellosis
(acute food poisoning) - is caused by a bacterium which can thrive in sewers, live stock facilities, septic tanks, cesspools, garbage, and other similar environments. It is spread mainly by fecal droppings by rats and mice.

Rat Bite Fever
- is caused by a bacterium which can live in the saliva of both rats and mice. It has flu like symptoms that can last for days and is sometimes fatal.

Leptospirosis
, Lymphocytic choriomeningitis, trichinosis, typhoid, dysentery as well as others.


10 Signs of Rat and Mice Infestation
Rats and mice almost always leave signs that can lead to their discovery
.  The ten signs to look for are:

1. droppings or feces
2. tracks
3. gnawing damage
4. burrows
5. runways
6. grease marks or rub marks
7. urine stains (which can be discovered with a blacklight)
8. live or dead rodents
9. rodent sounds
10. rodent odors (especially mice)


Rat and Mice Common Species in The USA
There are 3 main species of rats and mice that are of significance in the United States. They are the Roof Rat or tree Rat, the Norway Rat or ground rat, and the House Mouse. Of course there are lots of other species such as field mice, field rats, wharf rats, sewer rats, etc.. but the Roof Rats and Norway Rats and the House Mouse are the ones of primary importance.  They are the species of commensal rodents that homeowners and building owners deal with 90% of the time.

Roof Rat
The Roof Rat Has A Long Tail, Large Ears and Has A Slender Body.
Roof Rats Are Commonly Found In Trees, Attics, Old Houses,
And Is the #1 Rodent Found In Inner Cities.

Norway Rat
Norway Rats Have Small Ears, Short Tail, and Have A Fat Rounded Body.
Norway Rats Are Commonly Found In Fields, Sewers, Living Under Debris, Etc.
They Are The #1 Rat Infesting Barns, Poultry Houses, and Rural Areas.


House Mouse
The House Mouse Generally Lives Inside or Near Homes.
They Are The #1 Mouse Infesting Inner City Homes and Buildings.


How To Kill Rats and Mice
In your personal battle against rodents such as rats and mice, it is important to remember that you are dealing with an animal that is capable of crawling, climbing, and chewing it's way into your home or business.  They can flatten themselves out and squeeze through the smallest of openings, even under closed doors.   If the hole is not big enough, they can easily chew it or gnaw it to a large enough size so that they can get through.  Generally, if a rodent can squeeze it's head through an opening, (most rodents heads are the size of a quarter or smaller), it will eventually get through.   This is why your strategy for rat or mice control always starts on the outside of the structure.

Outdoors
- The first thing to do is to make sure that there are no holes that the rodents can get through.  Check all plumbing and electrical entrances, doors, folding garage doors, etc.   Also check behind gutters, around chimney and plumbing stack flashing, and in the case of raised or pier and beam homes, make sure that they cannot get access under the foundation or skirting or through screened vents.  The point is that any hole on the outside of the house can give rats or mice entrance.  If the hole is not big enough, the rats or mice will gnaw it to make it bigger.  Rats must constantly gnaw and sharpen their teeth to keep them filed down.  Rats teeth grow an average of 7 " per year. This is why they constantly gnaw and chew. 

Indoors - After the outside environment has been cleaned up, sealed up and outdoor bait stations have been used, inside control can begin.  The idea is that once the outside environment has been repaired and cleaned up, hopefully, the rodents will unable to gain entrance to the home or building and will be happy either remaining outside, until they consume the outside bait, or they will be trapped inside. 

Do Not Use Rat Baits Indoors !
We do not recommend using rat baits or rodenticides indoors.  If a rodent eats a rodenticide indoors, unless it can find its way out of the structure before the effects of the rodenticide set in - usually 3 to 5 days, it will die indoors.  There is no such thing as a rodenticide or a rat bait that causes the rodent to become thirsty and look for water.  There is also no such thing as a rodenticide that causes the rodents body to not smell or to dry out during the rotting phase.  These "white lies" are used by exterminators and other rodent control novices because tossing rat bait into an attic is easy and inexpensive. 

A rodent that eats a rodenticide dies because of internal hemorraging.  All rodent baits currently on the market work by thinning the rodents blood or anticoagulation.  If you use a rodenticide indoors and the rodent dies indoors, be prepared for a period of several weeks to months in which pungent foul odors wills linger in the air.  A rotting animal carcass usually bloats and the resulting body fluids will seep out and cause the odors.  Flies and other insects can be attracted to the rotting rodent carcass resulting in new problems.  The bottom line ?  Don't use rodenticides indoors because you don't want to spend the money on a decent trap.  You will pay down the road, especially if the rodent dies in an unreachable area of your attic or wall and cannot be removed.
 



house fly controlFly Control Due To Dead Rats and Mice
If rodents have died inside your walls and flies have appeared, then you will need to control them using our fly control products.  Hide Flies and Bottle Flies are very common where dead animals are found.  They are attracted by the foul rotting odors.  They will lay eggs in the decaying rodents carcass with a resulting infestation of flies appearing within days. 

 

 
 

To get rid of rodents or rats and mice from your home or business, you can always call Pest Control Orange County at (949) 584-7656
Serving: Orange County, Los Angeles County, Riverside, San Bernardino

ABOUT ORANGE COUNTY CALIFORNIA:

Orange County is a county in Southern California, United States. Its county seat is Santa Ana. According to the 2000 Census, its population was 2,846,289, making it the second most populous county in the state of California, and the fifth most populous in the United States. The state of California estimates its population as of 2007 to be 3,098,121 people, dropping its rank to third, behind San Diego County. Thirty-four incorporated cities are located in Orange County; the newest is Aliso Viejo.

Unlike many other large centers of population in the United States, Orange County uses its county name as its source of identification whereas other places in the country are identified by the large city that is closest to them. This is because there is no defined center to Orange County like there is in other areas which have one distinct large city. Five Orange County cities have populations exceeding 170,000 while no cities in the county have populations surpassing 360,000. Seven of these cities are among the 200 largest cities in the United States.

Orange County is also famous as a tourist destination, as the county is home to such attractions as Disneyland and Knott's Berry Farm, as well as sandy beaches for swimming and surfing, yacht harbors for sailing and pleasure boating, and extensive area devoted to parks and open space for golf, tennis, hiking, kayaking, cycling, skateboarding, and other outdoor recreation. It is at the center of Southern California's Tech Coast, with Irvine being the primary business hub.

The average price of a home in Orange County is $541,000. Orange County is the home of a vast number of major industries and service organizations. As an integral part of the second largest market in America, this highly diversified region has become a Mecca for talented individuals in virtually every field imaginable. Indeed the colorful pageant of human history continues to unfold here; for perhaps in no other place on earth is there an environment more conducive to innovative thinking, creativity and growth than this exciting, sun bathed valley stretching between the mountains and the sea in Orange County.

Orange County was Created March 11 1889, from part of Los Angeles County, and, according to tradition, so named because of the flourishing orange culture. Orange, however, was and is a commonplace name in the United States, used originally in honor of the Prince of Orange, son-in-law of King George II of England.

Incorporated: March 11, 1889
Legislative Districts:
* Congressional: 38th-40th, 42nd & 43
* California Senate: 31st-33rd, 35th & 37
* California Assembly: 58th, 64th, 67th, 69th, 72nd & 74

County Seat: Santa Ana
County Information:
Robert E. Thomas Hall of Administration
10 Civic Center Plaza, 3rd Floor, Santa Ana 92701
Telephone: (714)834-2345 Fax: (714)834-3098
County Government Website: http://www.oc.ca.gov

CITIES OF ORANGE COUNTY CALIFORNIA:


City of Aliso Viejo, 92653, 92656, 92698
City of Anaheim, 92801, 92802, 92803, 92804, 92805, 92806, 92807, 92808, 92809, 92812, 92814, 92815, 92816, 92817, 92825, 92850, 92899
City of Brea, 92821, 92822, 92823
City of Buena Park, 90620, 90621, 90622, 90623, 90624
City of Costa Mesa, 92626, 92627, 92628
City of Cypress, 90630
City of Dana Point, 92624, 92629
City of Fountain Valley, 92708, 92728
City of Fullerton, 92831, 92832, 92833, 92834, 92835, 92836, 92837, 92838
City of Garden Grove, 92840, 92841, 92842, 92843, 92844, 92845, 92846
City of Huntington Beach, 92605, 92615, 92646, 92647, 92648, 92649
City of Irvine, 92602, 92603, 92604, 92606, 92612, 92614, 92616, 92618, 92619, 92620, 92623, 92650, 92697, 92709, 92710
City of La Habra, 90631, 90632, 90633
City of La Palma, 90623
City of Laguna Beach, 92607, 92637, 92651, 92652, 92653, 92654, 92656, 92677, 92698
City of Laguna Hills, 92637, 92653, 92654, 92656
City of Laguna Niguel
, 92607, 92677
City of Laguna Woods, 92653, 92654
City of Lake Forest, 92609, 92630, 92610
City of Los Alamitos, 90720, 90721
City of Mission Viejo, 92675, 92690, 92691, 92692, 92694
City of Newport Beach, 92657, 92658, 92659, 92660, 92661, 92662, 92663
City of Orange, 92856, 92857, 92859, 92861, 92862, 92863, 92864, 92865, 92866, 92867, 92868, 92869
City of Placentia, 92870, 92871
City of Rancho Santa Margarita, 92688, 92679
City of San Clemente, 92672, 92673, 92674
City of San Juan Capistrano, 92675, 92690, 92691, 92692, 92693, 92694
City of Santa Ana, 92701, 92702, 92703, 92704, 92705, 92706, 92707, 92708, 92711, 92712, 92725, 92728, 92735, 92799
City of Seal Beach, 90740
City of Stanton, 90680
City of Tustin, 92780, 92781, 92782
City of Villa Park, 92861, 92867
City of Westminster, 92683, 92684, 92685
City of Yorba Linda, 92885, 92886, 92887

 

Noteworthy communities Some of the communities that exist within city limits are listed below: * Anaheim Hills, Anaheim * Balboa Island, Newport Beach * Corona del Mar, Newport Beach * Crystal Cove / Pelican Hill, Newport Beach * Capistrano Beach, Dana Point * El Modena, Orange * French Park, Santa Ana * Floral Park, Santa Ana * Foothill Ranch, Lake Forest * Monarch Beach, Dana Point * Nellie Gail, Laguna Hills * Northwood, Irvine * Woodbridge, Irvine * Newport Coast, Newport Beach * Olive, Orange * Portola Hills, Lake Forest * San Joaquin Hills, Laguna Niguel * San Joaquin Hills, Newport Beach * Santa Ana Heights, Newport Beach * Tustin Ranch, Tustin * Talega, San Clemente * West Garden Grove, Garden Grove * Yorba Hills, Yorba Linda * Mesa Verde, Costa Mesa

Unincorporated communities These communities are outside of the city limits in unincorporated county territory: * Coto de Caza * El Modena * Ladera Ranch * Las Flores * Midway City * Orange Park Acres * Rossmoor * Silverado Canyon * Sunset Beach * Surfside * Talega * Trabuco Canyon * Tustin Foothills

Adjacent counties to Orange County Are: * Los Angeles County, California - north, west * San Bernardino County, California - northeast * Riverside County, California - east * San Diego County, California - southeast

 

 

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Our Customers call us from the Orange County zipcodes and cities: Anaheim, 92801, 92802, 92803, 92804, 92805, 92806, 92807, 92808, 92809, 92812, 92814, 92815, 92816, 92817, 92825, 92850, 92899, Brea, 92821, 92822, 92823, Buena Park, 90620, 90621, 90622, 90623, 90624, Costa Mesa, 92626, 92627, 92628, Cypress, 90630, Fountain Valley, 92708, 92728, Fullerton, 92831, 92832, 92833, 92834, 92835, 92836, 92837, 92838, Garden Grove, 92840, 92841, 92842, 92843, 92844, 92845, 92846, Huntington Beach 92605, 92615, 92646, 92647, 92648, 92649, Irvine, 92602, 92603, 92604, 92606, 92612, 92614, 92616, 92618, 92619, 92620, 92623, 92650, 92697, 92709, 92710, La Habra, 90631, 90632, 90633, La Palma, 90623, Los Alamitos, 90720, 90721, Orange, 92856, 92857, 92859, 92861, 92862, 92863, 92864, 92865, 92866, 92867, 92868, 92869, Placentia 92870, 92871, Santa Ana, 92701, 92702, 92703, 92704, 92705, 92706, 92707, 92708, 92711, 92712, 92725, 92728, 92735, 92799, Seal Beach, 90740, Stanton, 90680, Tusin, 92780, 92781, 92782, Villa Park, 92861, 92867, Westminister, 92683, 92684, 92685, Yorba Linda, 92885, 92886, 92887,Aliso Viejo, 92653, 92656, 92698, Dana Point, 92624, 92629,Laguna Beach, 92607, 92637, 92651, 92652, 92653, 92654, 92656, 92677, 92698, Laguna Hills, 92637, 92653, 92654, 92656, Laguna Niguel, 92607, 92677, Laguna Woods, 92653, 92654, Lake Forest, 92609, 92630, Mission Viejo, 92675, 92690, 92691, 92692, 92694, Newport Beach, 92657, 92658, 92659, 92660, 92661, 92662, 92663, Rancho Santa Margarita, 92688, San Clemente, 92672, 92673, 92674, San Juan Capistrano, 92675, 92690, 92691, 92692, 92693, 92694, Ladera Ra,nch, 92694, Coto De Caza 92679 Anaheim Hills, 92807, 92808, 92809, 92817, Dove Canyon, 92679, Coto De Caza, 92679, Newport Coast, 92657, Corona Del Mar, 92625, El Modena, Las Flores, Midway City, Orange Park Acres, Rossmoor, Silverado Canyon, Sunset Beach, Surfside, Trabuco Canyon, Talega, Tustin Foothills

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