BEES, WASPS, BEE AND WASP CHARACTERISTICS, ORANGE COUNTY PEST CONTROL, PEST CONTROL ORANGE COUNTY, bee control, bee removal, wasp control, remove bees, remove wasp, remove honeycomb, honeycomb, honey, attic, cleanup, killer bees, africanized bees , Anaheim, 92801, 92802, 92803, 92804, 92805, 92806, 92807, 92808, 92809, 92812, 92814, 92815, 92816, 92817, 92825, 92850, 92899, Brea, 92821, 92822, 92823, Buena Park, 90620, 90621, 90622, 90623, 90624, Costa Mesa, 92626, 92627, 92628, Cypress, 90630, Fountain Valley, 92708, 92728, Fullerton, 92831, 92832, 92833, 92834, 92835, 92836, 92837, 92838, Garden Grove, 92840, 92841, 92842, 92843, 92844, 92845, 92846, Huntington Beach 92605, 92615, 92646, 92647, 92648, 92649, Irvine, 92602, 92603, 92604, 92606, 92612, 92614, 92616, 92618, 92619, 92620, 92623, 92650, 92697, 92709, 92710, La Habra, 90631, 90632, 90633, La Palma, 90623, Los Alamitos, 90720, 90721, Orange, 92856, 92857, 92859, 92861, 92862, 92863, 92864, 92865, 92866, 92867, 92868, 92869, Placentia 92870, 92871, Santa Ana, 92701, 92702, 92703, 92704, 92705, 92706, 92707, 92708, 92711, 92712, 92725, 92728, 92735, 92799, Seal Beach, 90740, Stanton, 90680, Tusin, 92780, 92781, 92782, Villa Park, 92861, 92867, Westminister, 92683, 92684, 92685, Yorba Linda, 92885, 92886, 92887,Aliso Viejo, 92653, 92656, 92698, Dana Point, 92624, 92629,Laguna Beach, 92607, 92637, 92651, 92652, 92653, 92654, 92656, 92677, 92698, Laguna Hills, 92637, 92653, 92654, 92656, Laguna Niguel, 92607, 92677, Laguna Woods, 92653, 92654, Lake Forest, 92609, 92630, Mission Viejo, 92675, 92690, 92691, 92692, 92694, Newport Beach, 92657, 92658, 92659, 92660, 92661, 92662, 92663, Rancho Santa Margarita, 92688, San Clemente, 92672, 92673, 92674, San Juan Capistrano, 92675, 92690, 92691, 92692, 92693, 92694, Ladera Ra,nch, 92694, Coto De Caza 92679 Anaheim Hills, 92807, 92808, 92809, 92817, Dove Canyon, 92679, Coto De Caza, 92679, Newport Coast, 92657, Corona Del Mar, 92625, El Modena, Las Flores, Midway City, Orange Park Acres, Rossmoor, Silverado Canyon, Sunset Beach, Surfside, Trabuco Canyon, Talega, Tustin Foothills , OC


" HELP ME! " Pest Control Orange County - Effective Professional Service !
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BEES
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- EARWIGS - SILVERFISH - BED BUGS - SNAILS - SLUGS - CARPET BEATLE - FLEAS
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Laguna Hills, CA 92653

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ARTICLE 1: HOW TO SELECT A PEST CONTROL COMPANY

ARTICLE 2: ALL ABOUT TERMITES AND TERMITE CONTROL

ARTICLE 3: ABOUT SPIDERS, KILLING SPIDERS AND SPIDER PEST CONTROL

ARTICLE 4: ABOUT COCKROACHES, KILLING COCKROACHES AND COCKROACH PEST CONTROL

ARTICLE 5: ABOUT ANTS, KILLING ANTS AND ANT PEST CONTROL

ARTICLE 6: ABOUT RODENTS, RAT & MICE PEST CONTROL

ARTICLE 7: ABOUT BEES AND WASPS, COMMON CHARACTERISTICS OF BEES AND WASPS

ARTICLE 8: ABOUT WOOD ROT - FIX WOOD ROT - WOOD DESTROYING BACTERIA

ARTICLE 9: GLOSSARY OF PEST CONTROL TERMS


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Our Customers call us from the Orange County zipcodes and cities: Anaheim, 92801, 92802, 92803, 92804, 92805, 92806, 92807, 92808, 92809, 92812, 92814, 92815, 92816, 92817, 92825, 92850, 92899, Brea, 92821, 92822, 92823, Buena Park, 90620, 90621, 90622, 90623, 90624, Costa Mesa, 92626, 92627, 92628, Cypress, 90630, Fountain Valley, 92708, 92728, Fullerton, 92831, 92832, 92833, 92834, 92835, 92836, 92837, 92838, Garden Grove, 92840, 92841, 92842, 92843, 92844, 92845, 92846, Huntington Beach 92605, 92615, 92646, 92647, 92648, 92649, Irvine, 92602, 92603, 92604, 92606, 92612, 92614, 92616, 92618, 92619, 92620, 92623, 92650, 92697, 92709, 92710, La Habra, 90631, 90632, 90633, La Palma, 90623, Los Alamitos, 90720, 90721, Orange, 92856, 92857, 92859, 92861, 92862, 92863, 92864, 92865, 92866, 92867, 92868, 92869, Placentia 92870, 92871, Santa Ana, 92701, 92702, 92703, 92704, 92705, 92706, 92707, 92708, 92711, 92712, 92725, 92728, 92735, 92799, Seal Beach, 90740, Stanton, 90680, Tusin, 92780, 92781, 92782, Villa Park, 92861, 92867, Westminister, 92683, 92684, 92685, Yorba Linda, 92885, 92886, 92887,Aliso Viejo, 92653, 92656, 92698, Dana Point, 92624, 92629,Laguna Beach, 92607, 92637, 92651, 92652, 92653, 92654, 92656, 92677, 92698, Laguna Hills, 92637, 92653, 92654, 92656, Laguna Niguel, 92607, 92677, Laguna Woods, 92653, 92654, Lake Forest, 92609, 92630, Mission Viejo, 92675, 92690, 92691, 92692, 92694, Newport Beach, 92657, 92658, 92659, 92660, 92661, 92662, 92663, Rancho Santa Margarita, 92688, San Clemente, 92672, 92673, 92674, San Juan Capistrano, 92675, 92690, 92691, 92692, 92693, 92694, Ladera Ra,nch, 92694, Coto De Caza 92679 Anaheim Hills, 92807, 92808, 92809, 92817, Dove Canyon, 92679, Coto De Caza, 92679, Newport Coast, 92657, Corona Del Mar, 92625, El Modena, Las Flores, Midway City, Orange Park Acres, Rossmoor, Silverado Canyon, Sunset Beach, Surfside, Trabuco Canyon, Talega, Tustin Foothills


ARTICLE 7:
BEES AND WASPS, COMMON CHARACTERISTICS OF THE BEE AND WASP
BEE
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ABOUT BEES

 

 

 

 

ABOUT WASPS


Genetics
In wasps, as in other Hymenoptera, sexes are significantly genetically different. Females have a diploid (2n) number of chromosomes and come about from fertilized eggs. Males, in contrast, have a haploid (n) number of chromosomes and develop from an unfertilized egg. Wasps store sperm inside their body and control its release for each individual egg as it is laid; if a female wishes to produce a male egg, she simply lays the egg without fertilizing it. Therefore, under most conditions in most species, wasps have complete voluntary control over the sex of their offspring.

Anatomy and gender
Anatomically, there is a great deal of variation between different species of wasp. Like all insects, wasps have a hard exoskeleton covering their 3 main body parts. These parts are known as the head, metasoma and mesosoma. Wasps also have a constricted region joining the first and second segments of the abdomen (the first segment is part of the mesosoma, the second is part of the metasoma) known as the petiole. Like all insects, wasps have 3 sets of 2 legs. In addition to their compound eyes, wasps also have several simple eyes known as ocelli. These are typically arranged in a triangular formation just forward of an area of the head known as the vertex. It is possible to distinguish between certain wasp species genders based on the number of divisions on their antennae. Male Yellowjacket wasps for example have 13 divisions per antenna, while females have 12. Males can in some cases be differentiated from females by virtue of the fact that the upper region of the male's mesosoma(called the tergum) consists of an additional terga. The total number of terga is typically 6. The difference between sterile female worker wasps and queens also varies between species but generally the queen is noticeably larger than both males and other females. Wasps can be differentiated from bees as bees have a flattened hind basitarsus. Unlike bees, wasps generally lack plumose hairs. They vary in the number and size of hairs they have between species.

Diet
Generally wasps are parasites or parasitoids as larvae, and feed only on nectar as adults. Many wasps are predatory, using other insects (often paralyzed) as food for their larvae. A few social wasps are omnivorous, feeding on a variety of fallen fruit, nectar, and carrion. Some of these social wasps, such as yellowjackets, may scavenge for dead insects to provide for their young. In many social species the larvae provide sweet secretions that are fed to the adults. In parasitic species, the first meals are almost always provided by the animal that the adult wasp used as a host for its young. Adult male wasps sometimes visit flowers to obtain nectar to feed on in much the same manner as honey bees. Occasionally, some species, such as yellowjackets, invade honey bee nests and steal honey and/or brood.

Wasp parasitism
With most species, adult parasitic wasps themselves do not take any nutrients from their prey, and, much like bees, butterflies, and moths, they typically derive all of their nutrition from nectar. Parasitic wasps are typically parasitoids, and extremely diverse in habits, many laying their eggs in inert stages of their host (egg or pupa), or sometimes paralyzing their prey by injecting it with venom through their ovipositor. They then insert one or more eggs into the host or deposit them upon the host externally. The host remains alive until the parasitoid larvae are mature, usually dying either when the parasitoids pupate, or when they emerge as adults.

Nesting habits
The type of nest produced by wasps can depend on the species and location. Many social wasps produce paper pulp nests on trees, in attics, holes in the ground or other such sheltered areas with access to the outdoors. By contrast solitary wasps are generally parasitic or predatory and only the latter build nests at all. Unlike honey bees, wasps have no wax producing glands. Many instead create a paper-like substance primarily from wood pulp. Wood fibers are gathered locally from weathered wood, softened by chewing and mixing with saliva. The pulp is then used to make combs with cells for brood rearing. More commonly, nests are simply burrows excavated in a substrate (usually the soil, but also plant stems), or, if constructed, they are constructed from mud.


Solitary wasps
The nesting habits of solitary wasps are more diverse than those of social wasps. Mud daubers and pollen wasps construct mud cells in sheltered places typically on the side of walls. Potter wasps similarly build vase-like nests from mud, often with multiple cells, attached to the twigs of trees or against walls. Most other predatory wasps burrow into soil or into plant stems, and a few do not build nests at all and prefer naturally occurring cavities, such as small holes in wood. A single egg is laid in each cell, which is sealed thereafter, so there is no interaction between the larvae and the adults, unlike in social wasps. In some species, male eggs are selectively placed on smaller prey, leading to males being generally smaller than females.

Social wasps
The nests of some social wasps, such as hornets, are first constructed by the queen and reach about the size of a walnut before sterile female workers take over construction. The queen initially starts the nest by making a single layer or canopy and working outwards until she reaches the edges of the cavity. Beneath the canopy she constructs a stalk to which she can attach several cells; these cells are where the first eggs will be laid. The queen then continues to work outwards to the edges of the cavity after which she adds another tier. This process is repeated, each time adding a new tier until eventually enough female workers have been born and matured to take over construction of the nest leaving the queen to focus on reproduction. For this reason, the size of a nest is generally a good indicator of approximately how many female workers there are in the colony. Social wasp colonies often have populations exceeding several thousand female workers and at least one queen. Polistes and some related types of paper wasp do not construct their nests in tiers but rather in flat single combs.

Social wasp reproductive cycle (temperate species only)
Wasps do not reproduce via mating flights like bees. Instead social wasps reproduce between a fertile queen and male wasp; in some cases queens may be fertilized by the sperm of several males. After successfully mating, the male's sperm cells are stored in a tightly packed ball inside the queen. The sperm cells are kept stored in a dormant state until they are needed the following spring. At a certain time of the year (often around autumn), the bulk of the wasp colony dies away, leaving only the young mated queens alive. During this time they leave the nest and find a suitable area to hibernate for the winter.

First stage After emerging from hibernation during early spring, the young queens search for a suitable nesting site. Upon finding an area for their future colony, the queen constructs a basic paper fiber nest roughly the size of a walnut into which she will begin to lay eggs.

Second stage The sperm that was stored earlier and kept dormant over winter is now used to fertilize the eggs being laid. The storage of sperm inside the female queen allows her to lay a considerable number of fertilized eggs without the need for repeated mating with a male wasp. For this reason a single female queen is capable of building an entire colony from only herself. The queen initially raises the first several sets of wasp eggs until enough sterile female workers exist to maintain the offspring without her assistance. All of the eggs produced at this time are sterile female workers who will begin to construct a more elaborate nest around their queen as they grow in number.

Third stage By this time the nest size has expanded considerably and now numbers between several hundred and several thousand wasps. Towards the end of the summer, the queen begins to run out of stored sperm to fertilize more eggs. These eggs develop into fertile males and fertile female queens. The male drones then fly out of the nest and find a mate thus perpetuating the wasp reproductive cycle. In most species of social wasp the young queens mate in the vicinity of their home nest and do not travel like their male counterparts do. The young queens will then leave the colony to hibernate for the winter once the other worker wasps and founder queen have started to die off. After successfully mating with a young queen, the male drones die off as well. Generally, young queens and drones from the same nest do not mate with each other; this ensures more genetic variation within wasp populations, especially considering that all members of the colony are theoretically the direct genetic descendants of the founder queen and a single male drone. In practice, however, colonies can sometimes consist of the offspring of several male drones. Wasp queens generally (but not always) create new nests each year, probably because the weak construction of most nests render them uninhabitable after the winter. Unlike most honey bee queens, wasp queens typically live for only one year (although exceptions are possible). Also, contrary to popular belief queen wasps do not organize their colony or have any raised status and hierarchical power within the social structure. They are more simply the reproductive element of the colony and the initial builder of the nest in those species which construct nests.

Social wasp caste structure
Not all social wasps have castes that are physically different in size and structure. In many polistine paper wasps and stenogastrines, for example, the castes of females are determined behaviorally, through dominance interactions, rather than having caste predetermined. All female wasps are potentially capable of becoming a colony's queen and this process is often determined by which female successfully lays eggs first and begins construction of the nest. Evidence suggests that females compete amongst each other by eating the eggs of other rival females. The queen may, in some cases, simply be the female that can eat the largest volume of eggs while ensuring that her own eggs survive (often achieved by laying the most). This process theoretically determines the strongest and most reproductively capable female and selects her as the queen. Once the first eggs have hatched, the subordinate females stop laying eggs and instead forage for the new queen and feed the young; that is, the competition largely ends, with the losers becoming workers, though if the dominant female dies, a new hierarchy may be established with a former "worker" acting as the replacement queen. Polistine nests are considerably smaller than many other social wasp nests, typically housing only around 250 wasps, compared to the several thousand common with yellowjackets, and stenogastrines have the smallest colonies of all, rarely with more than a dozen wasps in a mature colony.

Characteristics of common wasps and bees

While easily confused at a distance or without close observation, there are many different characteristics of bees and wasps which can be used to identify them.

Bees Wasps (Family: Vespidae)
Western honey bee Bumblebee Yellowjacket Paper Wasp Bald-faced hornet Hornet (European hornet)
image:Honeybee small.png Image:Bfraternus6867.jpg image:EuropeanWasp.jpg Image:PolistesB2650.jpg
Colors amber to brown translucent alternating with black stripes [1] video. yellow with black stripes, sometimes with red tail, to dark video. black and opaque bright yellow stripes video. dusty yellow to dark brown or black video. black and ivory white markings video. black and dark body with yellow [2] video.
Coat furry (short hair) furry (long hair) little or no hair some hair
Size 1.3 cm (½ inch) 2.5 cm (1 inch)[3] 1.3 cm (½ inch) 1.9–2.5 cm (¾ to 1 inch) up to 1.9 cm (¾ inch) up to 3.5 cm (1½ inch)
Legs not generally visible while flying[4] two long legs are visible hanging down during flight. no pollen baskets
Behavior gentle[5][6] gentle[6] aggressive[6] gentle[6] aggressive[6] gentle[7][6]
Food nectar from flowers other insects, overripe fruit, sugary drinks, human food / food waste, meat[8] other insects
Sting kills bee[9], continues pumping (barbed) retracts, can repeat (smooth)
Sting Pain 2.x 2.0 2.0 3.0 2.0 2.x[7]
Lights not attracted to lights at night[10] attracted to lights at night
Lives in large colonies of flat wax-based honeycomb hanging vertically small cavities in the soil small umbrella-shaped papery combs hanging horizontally in protected spaces such as attics, eaves or soil cavities large paper nest, upside down pear shaped, hanging from branches / eaves[11] very large paper nest in hollow trees, sheltered positions[12]

Notes
  1. ^ that is in general. Some are mostly black
  2. ^ there are different geographic colour forms
  3. ^ or more
  4. ^ When walking, light-colored pollen on the pollen baskets on a honeybee's rear legs can be visible.
  5. ^ Domesticated bees have been selected over time for gentleness. There are several races of domesticated honey bees with varying characteristics of honey production, disease resistance and gentleness.
  6. ^ a b c d e f Aggressive hive defense
  7. ^ a b Other hornet species (those not European hornet) have a more toxic sting, and are more aggressive.
  8. ^ Yellowjackets are carnivorous during the brood rearing part of the season. They feed insects to their brood, and obtain the sugar for their flight-muscle energy mostly from secretions of the brood. During this time they can be attracted to traps baited with meat or fish. Near the end of summer, when brood rearing ceases and this sugar source is no longer available, yellowjackets become frantic for sugar, and can be baited with sugar-based baits. They are also much more likely to visit fall flowers for nectar, than they are earlier in the season.
  9. ^ Since the barbed stinger evolved as a colony defense against vertebrates, the invariable outcome of stinging a mammal or bird is that the stinger becomes lodged in the victim's skin and tears free from the honey bee's body, leading to her death within minutes. As such, there is rarely any evolutionary advantage for a bee to sting a mammal to defend itself as an individual; honey bees will generally only sting when the hive is directly threatened, and honey bees found in the field or on a flower will rarely sting. Note: Africanized honey bees can be more aggressive than the more common European honey bees, but still only defend the hive, and their sting is the same.
  10. ^ unless nest is disturbed
  11. ^ Also barns, attics
  12. ^ Has a brown protective layer when the nest is in an unsheltered position. Also barns, attics, hollow walls, abandoned bee hives

ABOUT ORANGE COUNTY CALIFORNIA:

Orange County is a county in Southern California, United States. Its county seat is Santa Ana. According to the 2000 Census, its population was 2,846,289, making it the second most populous county in the state of California, and the fifth most populous in the United States. The state of California estimates its population as of 2007 to be 3,098,121 people, dropping its rank to third, behind San Diego County. Thirty-four incorporated cities are located in Orange County; the newest is Aliso Viejo.

Unlike many other large centers of population in the United States, Orange County uses its county name as its source of identification whereas other places in the country are identified by the large city that is closest to them. This is because there is no defined center to Orange County like there is in other areas which have one distinct large city. Five Orange County cities have populations exceeding 170,000 while no cities in the county have populations surpassing 360,000. Seven of these cities are among the 200 largest cities in the United States.

Orange County is also famous as a tourist destination, as the county is home to such attractions as Disneyland and Knott's Berry Farm, as well as sandy beaches for swimming and surfing, yacht harbors for sailing and pleasure boating, and extensive area devoted to parks and open space for golf, tennis, hiking, kayaking, cycling, skateboarding, and other outdoor recreation. It is at the center of Southern California's Tech Coast, with Irvine being the primary business hub.

The average price of a home in Orange County is $541,000. Orange County is the home of a vast number of major industries and service organizations. As an integral part of the second largest market in America, this highly diversified region has become a Mecca for talented individuals in virtually every field imaginable. Indeed the colorful pageant of human history continues to unfold here; for perhaps in no other place on earth is there an environment more conducive to innovative thinking, creativity and growth than this exciting, sun bathed valley stretching between the mountains and the sea in Orange County.

Orange County was Created March 11 1889, from part of Los Angeles County, and, according to tradition, so named because of the flourishing orange culture. Orange, however, was and is a commonplace name in the United States, used originally in honor of the Prince of Orange, son-in-law of King George II of England.

Incorporated: March 11, 1889
Legislative Districts:
* Congressional: 38th-40th, 42nd & 43
* California Senate: 31st-33rd, 35th & 37
* California Assembly: 58th, 64th, 67th, 69th, 72nd & 74

County Seat: Santa Ana
County Information:
Robert E. Thomas Hall of Administration
10 Civic Center Plaza, 3rd Floor, Santa Ana 92701
Telephone: (714)834-2345 Fax: (714)834-3098
County Government Website: http://www.oc.ca.gov

CITIES OF ORANGE COUNTY CALIFORNIA:


City of Aliso Viejo, 92653, 92656, 92698
City of Anaheim, 92801, 92802, 92803, 92804, 92805, 92806, 92807, 92808, 92809, 92812, 92814, 92815, 92816, 92817, 92825, 92850, 92899
City of Brea, 92821, 92822, 92823
City of Buena Park, 90620, 90621, 90622, 90623, 90624
City of Costa Mesa, 92626, 92627, 92628
City of Cypress, 90630
City of Dana Point, 92624, 92629
City of Fountain Valley, 92708, 92728
City of Fullerton, 92831, 92832, 92833, 92834, 92835, 92836, 92837, 92838
City of Garden Grove, 92840, 92841, 92842, 92843, 92844, 92845, 92846
City of Huntington Beach, 92605, 92615, 92646, 92647, 92648, 92649
City of Irvine, 92602, 92603, 92604, 92606, 92612, 92614, 92616, 92618, 92619, 92620, 92623, 92650, 92697, 92709, 92710
City of La Habra, 90631, 90632, 90633
City of La Palma, 90623
City of Laguna Beach, 92607, 92637, 92651, 92652, 92653, 92654, 92656, 92677, 92698
City of Laguna Hills, 92637, 92653, 92654, 92656
City of Laguna Niguel
, 92607, 92677
City of Laguna Woods, 92653, 92654
City of Lake Forest, 92609, 92630, 92610
City of Los Alamitos, 90720, 90721
City of Mission Viejo, 92675, 92690, 92691, 92692, 92694
City of Newport Beach, 92657, 92658, 92659, 92660, 92661, 92662, 92663
City of Orange, 92856, 92857, 92859, 92861, 92862, 92863, 92864, 92865, 92866, 92867, 92868, 92869
City of Placentia, 92870, 92871
City of Rancho Santa Margarita, 92688, 92679
City of San Clemente, 92672, 92673, 92674
City of San Juan Capistrano, 92675, 92690, 92691, 92692, 92693, 92694
City of Santa Ana, 92701, 92702, 92703, 92704, 92705, 92706, 92707, 92708, 92711, 92712, 92725, 92728, 92735, 92799
City of Seal Beach, 90740
City of Stanton, 90680
City of Tustin, 92780, 92781, 92782
City of Villa Park, 92861, 92867
City of Westminster, 92683, 92684, 92685
City of Yorba Linda, 92885, 92886, 92887

 

Noteworthy communities Some of the communities that exist within city limits are listed below: * Anaheim Hills, Anaheim * Balboa Island, Newport Beach * Corona del Mar, Newport Beach * Crystal Cove / Pelican Hill, Newport Beach * Capistrano Beach, Dana Point * El Modena, Orange * French Park, Santa Ana * Floral Park, Santa Ana * Foothill Ranch, Lake Forest * Monarch Beach, Dana Point * Nellie Gail, Laguna Hills * Northwood, Irvine * Woodbridge, Irvine * Newport Coast, Newport Beach * Olive, Orange * Portola Hills, Lake Forest * San Joaquin Hills, Laguna Niguel * San Joaquin Hills, Newport Beach * Santa Ana Heights, Newport Beach * Tustin Ranch, Tustin * Talega, San Clemente * West Garden Grove, Garden Grove * Yorba Hills, Yorba Linda * Mesa Verde, Costa Mesa

Unincorporated communities These communities are outside of the city limits in unincorporated county territory: * Coto de Caza * El Modena * Ladera Ranch * Las Flores * Midway City * Orange Park Acres * Rossmoor * Silverado Canyon * Sunset Beach * Surfside * Talega * Trabuco Canyon * Tustin Foothills

Adjacent counties to Orange County Are: * Los Angeles County, California - north, west * San Bernardino County, California - northeast * Riverside County, California - east * San Diego County, California - southeast

 

 

Pl

" HELP ME! " Pest Control Orange County - Effective Professional Service !
TERMITES - ANTS - SPIDERS - RODENTS - MICE - RATS - ROACHES - BUGS -
BEES
CRICKETS - EARWIGS - SILVERFISH - BED BUGS - SNAILS - SLUGS - CARPET BEATLE - FLEAS

We do COMMERICAL, RESIDENTIAL and FUMIGATIONS
Member of Pest Control Operators of California, PCOC.ORG
Call Us Today!
(949) 584-7656
Ask For Jay
Serving: Orange County, Los Angeles County, Riverside, San Bernardino


DISCOUNTS FOR: Seniors, Military, Law Enforcement, Fire Department

BEES, WASPS, BEE AND WASP CHARACTERISTICS, ORANGE COUNTY PEST CONTROL, PEST CONTROL ORANGE COUNTY, bee control, bee removal, wasp control, remove bees, remove wasp, remove honeycomb, honeycomb, honey, attic, cleanup, killer bees, africanized bees

ORANGE COUNTY PEST CONTROL, PEST CONTROL ORANGE COUNTY, PEST CONTROL IN ORANGE COUNTY,
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Our Customers call us from the Orange County zipcodes and cities: Anaheim, 92801, 92802, 92803, 92804, 92805, 92806, 92807, 92808, 92809, 92812, 92814, 92815, 92816, 92817, 92825, 92850, 92899, Brea, 92821, 92822, 92823, Buena Park, 90620, 90621, 90622, 90623, 90624, Costa Mesa, 92626, 92627, 92628, Cypress, 90630, Fountain Valley, 92708, 92728, Fullerton, 92831, 92832, 92833, 92834, 92835, 92836, 92837, 92838, Garden Grove, 92840, 92841, 92842, 92843, 92844, 92845, 92846, Huntington Beach 92605, 92615, 92646, 92647, 92648, 92649, Irvine, 92602, 92603, 92604, 92606, 92612, 92614, 92616, 92618, 92619, 92620, 92623, 92650, 92697, 92709, 92710, La Habra, 90631, 90632, 90633, La Palma, 90623, Los Alamitos, 90720, 90721, Orange, 92856, 92857, 92859, 92861, 92862, 92863, 92864, 92865, 92866, 92867, 92868, 92869, Placentia 92870, 92871, Santa Ana, 92701, 92702, 92703, 92704, 92705, 92706, 92707, 92708, 92711, 92712, 92725, 92728, 92735, 92799, Seal Beach, 90740, Stanton, 90680, Tusin, 92780, 92781, 92782, Villa Park, 92861, 92867, Westminister, 92683, 92684, 92685, Yorba Linda, 92885, 92886, 92887,Aliso Viejo, 92653, 92656, 92698, Dana Point, 92624, 92629,Laguna Beach, 92607, 92637, 92651, 92652, 92653, 92654, 92656, 92677, 92698, Laguna Hills, 92637, 92653, 92654, 92656, Laguna Niguel, 92607, 92677, Laguna Woods, 92653, 92654, Lake Forest, 92609, 92630, Mission Viejo, 92675, 92690, 92691, 92692, 92694, Newport Beach, 92657, 92658, 92659, 92660, 92661, 92662, 92663, Rancho Santa Margarita, 92688, San Clemente, 92672, 92673, 92674, San Juan Capistrano, 92675, 92690, 92691, 92692, 92693, 92694, Ladera Ra,nch, 92694, Coto De Caza 92679 Anaheim Hills, 92807, 92808, 92809, 92817, Dove Canyon, 92679, Coto De Caza, 92679, Newport Coast, 92657, Corona Del Mar, 92625, El Modena, Las Flores, Midway City, Orange Park Acres, Rossmoor, Silverado Canyon, Sunset Beach, Surfside, Trabuco Canyon, Talega, Tustin Foothills

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